The wonders of Ravenna

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Basilica di San Vitale, one of eight UNESCO World Heritage sites in Ravenna.

Ravenna is a small, historic town in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna. Located close to the Adriatic Sea, the town can trace its history back more than 2,000 years. Ravenna enjoyed a prosperous period during Roman rule in the 1st century A.D. before being occupied by a succession of other powers including the Ostrogoths and the Byzantines. Each ruler left his mark in the town, much of which can still be seen till this day – that explains the fact that despite its small size, Ravenna boasts no less than eight(!) UNESCO World Heritage sites. Despite these significant attractions, the town is far from over-run by tourists, allowing visitors to enjoy its historic wonders at a leisurely pace. In addition, a large part of Ravenna’s centre is a pedestrian zone – the only thing you’ll have to look out for when you’re strolling around are bicycles!

The mosaics of Ravenna

I was attracted to Ravenna after reading up about its UNESCO sites and stunning mosaics but during my stay there, I discovered other great reasons that warrant a stay of at least a few days. The UNESCO sites can be covered in a day or two as most of them are within walking distance of one another. The ticket office near the Basilica di San Vitale sells single tickets that cover entrance to five of the eight sites. I started my walk at the 1st century Basilica di San Vitale, one of the most treasured examples of early Christian and Byzantine art in Western Europe. The basilica, with its towering columns and rich, vividly-coloured mosaics, is absolutely awe-inspiring.

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The Basilica di San Vitale

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The stunning dome of the Basilica di San Vitale.

Right next to the basilica is another UNESCO site, the Mausoleo di Galla Placidia. This mausoleum contains three sarcophagi, amongst which a sarcophagus that contains the remains of Galla Placidia, the daughter of a Roman Emperor. UNESCO describes this mausoleum as one of the best-preserved mosaic monuments, and rightfully so. The intricate mosaics, stunning depictions and striking colours are jaw-dropping beautiful. Cole Porter reputedly composed his famous song, ‘Night & Day’ after a visit here in the 1920′s. I can imagine why. As you enter, you’re greeted by a rich blue ceiling with glittering gold stars. It’s incredible, once you think about it, how much effort was made to create these masterpieces using miniscule, coloured tiles!

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Entering the Mausoleo di Galla Placidia.

The other UNESCO sites I visited included the impressive Battistero Neoniano, the little but no less impressive Capella di San Andrea (both of which are adjacent to Ravenna’s Duomo), and the cavernous Basilica di Sant’Apollinare Nuovo.

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The dome of the Battisterio Neoniano

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The rich mosaics of Capella di San Andrea

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Inside the cavernous Basilica di S. Apollinare Nuovo.

Exploring Ravenna

Ravenna itself is a lovely town with charming streets filled with boutiques, cafés, shops selling regional produce, restaurants and gelaterias! The town’s central point is the picturesque Piazza del Popolo. From here, pedestrian-only streets fan out in different directions.

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The Piazza del Popolo

At certain points in the town, visitors will find large interactive screens which provide lots of information about attractions, shops and restaurants.

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My travel mate, Claudia, testing the visitor info screens.

The Via Cavour, Via IV Novembre and Via Corrado Ricci were my favourite streets. Via Cavour is the main shopping street and extends from the historic Porta Ariana to the heart of the city at Via IV Novembre, where you can find a plethora of restaurants and cafés. I discovered a fabulous restaurant in this street called Bella Venezia (reservations recommended). The food was superb!

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Via Cavour in Ravenna

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Restaurants and cafés in Via IV Novembre.

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The sublime melon and ham at Bella Venezia.

Another restaurant in the same street I can recommend is Capello. After having a gorgeous dinner at Bella Venezia, I made another awesome discovery: Papilla, one of the best gelaterias I’ve ever been to! There’s a chocolate tap near the entrance which made my mouth water the second I saw it! I chose two flavours (chocolate and mango) and had the cone filled up with more chocolate. The result: an experience I won’t easily forget!

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The fabulous chocolate fountain at Papilla!

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Getting my ice-cream cone filled with chocolate! :-)

YUMMY!!! :-)

YUMMY!!! :-)

A walk along Via Corrado Ricci will bring you past other Ravenna attractions such as the Biblioteca Oriani at the Piazza Sant Francesco and Dante Alighieri‘s Tomb (prior to visiting Ravenna, I had no idea this famous poet was buried here). In the evenings, you’ll find people crowding around Ca de Ven, a bar/restaurant which truly is an institution in Ravenna. The atmosphere is terrific, and if the restaurant is full, simply have a drink at the bar during Aperitivo (Italian Happy Hour) and dig into the Aperitivo buffet (the food is included in the price of the drink).

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Ca de Ven in Ravenna.

I absolutely enjoyed my visit to Ravenna and wished I could’ve stayed longer – two days was a tad too short. I loved the laid-back vibe of the town whilst the UNESCO sites were truly awe-inspiring. Ravenna is easily accessible by train from Bologna and Rimini, about an hour from both. If you’re travelling through Italy and visiting Emilia-Romagna, don’t miss Ravenna!

Read more about Ravenna.

Note: my visit to Ravenna was part of the Blogville project, a collaboration between the Emilia-Romagna Tourism Board and iambassador.

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15 Responses to “The wonders of Ravenna”

  1. A Lady in London 04/12/2013 4:38 pm
    #

    I agree about Ravenna having a lot to offer. I went last year and loved all of the history and mosaics!

  2. Sand In My Suitcase 07/09/2013 4:12 pm
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    Ravenna looks like a charming Italian town – worthy of plonking one’s self down at one of those little cafes, ordering a cappuccino (maybe chased by a gelato!) and doing some fun people watching…

  3. On A Junket 29/08/2013 2:50 pm
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    Great Shots. Enjoyed the 360. And the chocolate, mmm chocolate…you bastard! Now I’m craving ice cream…

  4. rob hermans 22/08/2013 9:27 pm
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    again, such lovely colors…

  5. Keith Jenkins 31/07/2013 11:12 am
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    Thanks for featuring my Ravenna post in your web wrap! It sure is a gorgeous town and the mosaics are mind-blowing!

    Cheers,
    Keith

  6. Frugal Monkey 31/07/2013 10:00 am
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    What a great insight into this hidden gem! We’ve included it in our latest web wrap: http://www.frugalmonkey.com/travel-news/frugal-monkeys-web-wrap-31-july-2013.html

  7. Christoffer Moen 28/07/2013 11:13 am
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    Have not gone to Ravenna but definitely is on top of my list in the future. Inricate, stunning mosaics I must say.. to think of all the work, dedication, and vision into that is quite remarkable. Thanks for sharing! Cheers.

  8. Barbara 26/07/2013 11:04 pm
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    This looks amazingly beautiful and we will definitely keep it in mind for our next visit to Italy. The images of the mosaics are stunning! Thank you for sharing this information and wonderful images as well.

  9. Shalu Sharma 26/07/2013 10:11 pm
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    I have not been to Ravenna but it does seem very interesting place to visit. You can’t beat that ice cream.

  10. Keith Jenkins 25/07/2013 9:19 am
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    Hi Lesley,
    Thanks for your lovely comment. I can definitely relate to your experience. It was hard to tear myself away from the majesty of the basilica. I’ll never forget the moment I entered. My jaw dropped and I manage a soft “OMG!”. It was incredible.

    Cheers,
    Keith

  11. Lesley Peterson 25/07/2013 4:00 am
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    The mosaics of San Vitale were one of life’s pivot points for me. I couldn’t tear myself away and felt changed afterwards. If you love Italy or mosaics, Ravenna is not just worth the trip but essential. Probably the finest thing I’ve seen in my life.

  12. Keith Jenkins 24/07/2013 5:29 pm
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    Hi Melissa,

    You definitely have to return to see those mosaics!

    Cheers,
    Keith

  13. Melissa 24/07/2013 5:28 pm
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    I almost visited Ravenna when I was in Bologna this year, but I ended up taking a food tour in Modena instead. I’ll have to visit this region again and take in all those mosaics in person.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Bologna on my mind | Velvet Escape - 18/03/2014

    […] and historic towns which shouldn’t be missed. Towns that should be high on your list include Ravenna, with its UNESCO Heritage mosaics, and Modena, home of the world famous balsamico and motor brands […]

  2. Frugal Monkey’s Web Wrap – 31 July 2013 | FrugalMonkey Travel Discounts - 31/07/2013

    [...] The Wonders of Ravenna @ Velvet Escape – Before we read this article, the tiny Italian town of Ravenna wasn’t even on our radar. After seeing pictures of its stunning mosaics and delicious food, we’re desperate to witness it for ourselves. This article gives a fascinating insight into this largely unknown gem. [...]

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